Zooming into the Past                         

  

 

P U N T L A N D

REGIONS AND TERRITORIES

 

 

 

 

 

Regions and territories: Puntland

 

August 23, 2006

 

 

Puntland, an arid region of north-east Somalia, declared itself an autonomous state in August 1998.

 

The move was, in part, an attempt to avoid the clan warfare engulfing southern Somalia. Nevertheless, the region has endured armed conflict.

 

Unlike its neighbour, breakaway Somaliland, Puntland says it does not seek recognition as an independent entity, wishing instead to be part of a federal Somalia. Its leaders have taken part in talks aimed at fostering Somali reconciliation.

 

Sporadic fighting has broken out between Puntland and Somaliland over the ownership of the latter's Sool and Sanaag regions, which are claimed by Puntland on the basis of ethnicity. Violence also accompanied a political power struggle in 2001 between rival claimants to the Puntland leadership.

 

Livestock herding and fishing sustain the people - many of them nomads - of the drought-prone region. The money sent home from overseas workers is an important source of foreign exchange.

 

Puntland is a destination for many Somalis displaced by violence in the south; some of them attempt to make the sea crossing to Yemen.

 

The region's coast was hit by the December 2004 Asian tsunami; more than 300 people were killed and thousands lost their livelihoods.

 

The territory takes its name from the Land of Punt, a centre of trade for the ancient Egyptians and a place shrouded in legend. But ancient Punt and present-day Puntland are not necessarily one and the same place.

 

Population: 2.4 million (Puntland government estimate, 2003)Capital: Garowe (administrative), Bosasso (commercial)Major languages: Somali, Arabic Major religion: Islam Life expectancy: n/a Monetary unit: Somali shilling Main export: Livestock GNI per capita: n/a International dialling code: +252

 

Leader: General Mohamud Muse Hersi (Adde), elected by parliament in January 2005

 

Puntland is governed by a 66-member House of Representatives and a traditional council of elders.

 

The territory's first leader, Colonel Abdullahi Yusuf, served a three-year term until 2001, when his attempt to extend his mandate triggered fierce fighting.

 

Col Yusuf reclaimed the leadership in 2002 and led Puntland until his election as Somalia's transitional president in October 2004. He was known for his authoritarian approach.

 

Although Puntland's charter provides for freedom of the press, the authorities have resorted to detaining journalists and closing media outlets.

 

In 2002 they shut down the private Somali Broadcasting Corporation's (SBC) radio and TV stations in Bosasso. The broadcaster was accused of favouring Colonel Abdullahi Yusuf's rival for the presidency. The license was restored in 2003.

 

The press Kaaha Bari - weekly Yamayska - weekly

 

Television Somali Broadcasting Corporation (SBC) - private, Bosasso

 

Radio SBC Radio - private, Bosasso Radio Midnimo - private, Bosasso Radio Galkayo Radio Nugaal Garowe.

 

BBC News Limited 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

 

PUNTLAND IN PICTURES

 

BUURAHA CALMADOW

 

GEELA CALMADOW

 

CALMADOW

 

DURDURKA CALMADOW

 

 

XEEBTA SANAAG

 

 

 

BOSASO SEAPORT

 

BUUNDADA TOGGA LAAG

 

 

 

PUNTLAND COMMUNITY COLLAGE

 

 

PUNTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY

 

EAST AFRICA UNIVERSITY, BOSASO

 

               

EAST AFRICA UNIVERSITY: 2005 GRADUATING STUDENTS

 

 

 

 

 

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